Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Search Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 1010
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 33  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 372-378

Evaluation of genomic damage from buccal epithelial cells in patients subjected to cone beam computed tomography


1 Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Lenora Institute of Dental Sciences, Rajahmundry, Andhra Pradesh, India
2 Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, GSL Dental College and Hospital, Rajahmundry, Andhra Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Gutta Mounika
Post Graduate Student, Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Lenora Institute of Dental Sciences, Rajahmundry, Andhra Pradesh
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jiaomr.jiaomr_83_21

Rights and Permissions

Background: Radiography forms an important and integral part in diagnosis which is used in the oral and maxillofacial region to give an appropriate diagnosis and treatment planning. But, diagnostic radiations also induce some amount of cell damage at cytogenetic levels, depending on the dosage of the radiation administered. The ionizing radiation which has been emitted during these procedures has deleterious effects on the DNA and induces cell death. Aim: To evaluate the genomic damage from buccal epithelial cells in patients subjected to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Patients were divided into two groups with 30 subjects in each group. Group-1 included the subjects advised for single CBCT exposure and Group-2 included the subjects advised for double CBCT exposure. Exfoliated buccal epithelial cells were collected immediately before the exposure, 15 days, and 30 days after the CBCT exposure. The cytological smears were examined to detect the micronucleus and pyknotic nucleus. Results: The mean of the micronucleus and pyknotic nucleus obtained from group-2 (double exposure) subjects was significantly higher in males than group-1 (single exposure) subjects with a P value of 0.0001 during pre-exposure, 15 days, and 30 days after exposure. Conclusion: Genomic damage does take place due to cone-beam computed tomography. So, CBCT should be cautiously used when necessary and it cannot be considered as a risk-free procedure.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed704    
    Printed22    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded181    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal