Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Search Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 714
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 168-172

Comparison of Oral Health Indicators in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients and Controls


1 Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, NIMS Dental College and Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
2 Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Maharana Pratap College of Dentistry and Research Center Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh, India
3 Department of Orthodontics, Maharana Pratap College of Dentistry and Research Center Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh, India
4 Department of Orthodontics, NIMS Dental College and Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
5 Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Jaipur Dental College, Jaipur, India
6 Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology Karnavati School of Dentistry, Gandhi Nagar, Gujarat, India

Correspondence Address:
Rohit Sharma
Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, NIMS Dental College and Hospital, Shobha Nagar, Jaipur, Rajasthan
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10011-1121

Rights and Permissions

Introduction India leads the world with largest number of diabetic subjects earning the dubious distinction of being termed the 'diabetes capital of the world'. Oral manifestations of diabetes mellitus are devastating, these include gingival and periodontal diseases, bone loss, dental caries, alterations in salivary flow and others. Materials and methods: In our study, sample consists of 50 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (study group) and 50 nondiabetic patients (control group) of age range of 35 to 70 years. The oral indicators used in the study are orthopantomogram, decayed-missing-filled teeth index, oral hygiene index-simplified, periodontal index, gingival index, body mass index, waist circumferences, fasting blood sugar, postprandial glucose and random fasting blood sugar should be replaced by random blood sugar. Results: In our study, statistically body mass index (p < 0.01), waist circumference (p < 0.001), periodontal disease index (p < 0.01), gingival index (p < 0.01) and bone loss (p < 0.001) were higher in diabetic group than nondiabetic group and were significant. And, periodontal index of smokers is significantly higher than compared with nonsmokers diabetic patients. Conclusion: The results of present study demonstrate that gingival index, periodontal index and bone loss measurements in diabetic patients are significantly higher than nondiabetic patients. Smoking is also a promoting factor of periodontal disease in diabetic patients.


[PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1155    
    Printed30    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded177    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal